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The most walkable cities and Venice saved from flooding

London, Paris, Bogota, and Hong Kong are the most “walkable” cities in the world. Walking is crucial for taking care of health, reducing pollution and emissions from transport as well as building healthier communities and economies. The report made by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy took into consideration three criteria: the percentage of people living within 100 meters from a car-free place; the percentage of people living within the one-kilometer range of both healthcare and education; and the average size of a city block, with the preference for the smaller ones.

People responsible for planning suburbs should think of reducing car dependency, boosting health, supporting seniors, promoting diversity and justice, creating job opportunities, and protecting the environment, according to architects June Williams and Ellen Dunham-Jones. One of the positive examples could be the redevelopment of a former airport in Austin, Texas. Small blocks, narrow streets that reduce car speeds and the green infrastructure make inhabitants walk more, which improves their health.

The MOSE project barriers raised in Venice saved the city from flood for the second time, already. On October 15th seventy-eight barriers were activated after forecasts predicted that the tidal wave would reach up to 135 cm. Without them, the water would enter half of the city, including St Mark’s square.

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