PL | EN

Sustainable construction of skyscrapers and the Bologna tower

The Sara Cultural Center in Skellefteå, Sweden, is one of the tallest wooden buildings in the world and an experiment in sustainable architecture. The building is approximately 80 m high, has 20 floors and is made of wood from local forests. The project is “carbon negative” – 5,631 t of CO₂ generated during logging, transport and processing of trees, construction and operation of the building will be offset by 9,095 t of CO₂ accumulated in the wood used. Structural wood is as strong as steel and concrete, and building rules in Europe and the US are changing to accommodate large and tall timber structures.

The authorities of Bologna wonder what to do with the 48-metre-tall Garisenda tower, built at the beginning of the 12th century. It was tilted by 4 degrees, but a recent unexpected movement of the structure requires further careful investigation. Restoration – an attempt to straighten the tower, strengthen its base or rebuild the structure more solidly – could take up to a decade.

How is the high-rise construction industry changing? In New York, 500 buildings already have the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certificate, proving sustainable development. Low-e glass, high-performance insulation and green roofs are used, such as those on the Javits Center and Barclays Center. BIM technology – building information modelling – reduces rework by 30% and shortens construction time, and the Internet of Things (IoT) intelligently manages buildings. New York is investing in renewable energy sources and intends to use them to meet over 100% of the city’s needs by 2050.

Read also
European Union countries supporting migration
European Union countries supporting migration
The European Union will allocate approximately EUR 210 million to help Mauritania reduce the number of migrants passing through the country on their way to Spain’s Canary Islands. Even though Mauritania does not border the EU, many asylum seekers pass through its territory. According to official data, 83% of migrants arriving in the Canary Islands […]
Bird flu virus in Great Britain and endangered migratory species
Bird flu virus in Great Britain and endangered migratory species
According to a report by the British Trust for Ornithology and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, since the attack of the bird flu virus in 2021, Great Britain has lost, among others, over 75% of the great skua population. The virus has also caused a 21% decline in the population of roseate […]
Robotic guide dog, MiniTouch and a smart ring
Robotic guide dog, MiniTouch and a smart ring
Scientists from the University of Glasgow are developing a robotic dog similar to a guide dog. Using artificial intelligence, RoboGuide is intended to make it easier for blind and visually impaired people to move freely around spaces such as museums, hospitals and shopping malls. It will be based on mapping sensors and assessing the environment […]
Visa-free borders of Iran and the first tourists in North Korea
Visa-free borders of Iran and the first tourists in North Korea
Iran is introducing visa-free entry for citizens of 33 countries, including Russia. Western countries were not included. The decision coincided with the deterioration of Iran’s relations with the West due to attacks by rebel groups linked to that country. It is intended to stimulate tourism and counteract the world’s growing aversion to Iran. In addition […]
The Houthi movement and undersea communication cables and Internet blockades
The Houthi movement and undersea communication cables and Internet blockades
Yemen’s government has warned of Houthi sabotage of vital undersea communications cables, including internet connections, that run under the Red Sea and connect Asia with Europe. The group declared access to maps showing the route of undersea communication cables in the Bab al-Mandab Strait. However, experts are sceptical about the Houthis’ technical capabilities to cut […]
Previous issues