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The Muezzins have been woken up by a grey dawn and the morning breeze has spread up their call to prayer through the dusty alleys. Mogadishu is waking up, still relatively calm, yet slowly becoming more hot and tumultuous. Often when people hear about Mogadishu they immediately think about the movie “Black Hawk Down”. Somali people are reluctant to think about this period of time and although it’s long gone, the civil war continues. The only thing that has changed throughout the years is the type of terror, apart of that, the daily reality is pretty similar to how it was before. People still flee from the war, violence, fight with hunger and their whole existence is reduced to an effort to just make it through the day.

Mogadishu

author Marcin Suder
Explore the story
Scenes of violence inside.

The City

Mogadishu used to be known as the white pearl of the Indian Ocean. Today, this city of nearly two million and a half inhabitants is a shadow of its former self and the period of wars, which has torn through the city, has scarring the inhabitants as well. Filled with ruins, refugee camps, and human suffering it is slowly coming back to normality and starts to dream of its former glory.

 

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Mogadishu is the capital of Somalia, a country located in the Horn of Africa. It became independent in 1960, when British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland united to form Somali Republic. It ended the colonial period in the Somali history. Slowly built structures of the new state were weakened when the then president Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was murdered in 1969. Soon after, there was a bloodless coup d’etat organized by General Mohamed Siad Barre, who took power by leading the newly formed Supreme Revolutionary Council.

Siad Barre, who had military training in Moscow in the 1960’s, supported a Marxist system and tried to introduce socialism based on Koran and Marxism in Somalia.

Due to the new system’s inspiration, the members of the former government were arrested, political parties were dissolved, as well as the Parliament and the Supreme Court, and the Constitution was suspended. However, at the same time Mogadishu has turned into a modern, developing and beautiful city. With lots of white houses, located on the shore of the Indian Ocean, it was called the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and could have become a great holiday resort.

Nevertheless, it has never happened. A war with Ethiopia, an old enemy, broke out. Soon Somalia got engaged in other wars. It was a pawn in the Cold War games between the Western superpowers and the Soviet Union, which competed for the spheres of influence in the world.

Siad Barre had a policy that was about to eradicate a system based on clan divisions. Unfortunately, in order to remain power, he surrounded himself with people from his clan and led to a situation where more and more Somalis were disappointed with the politics of the regime. It was obvious, that the Somali regime wanted to introduce a totalitarian system. As a result, a civil war broke out. The process of state deterioration was slowly taking place, until it reached a point in the 90s, when the government, the system, and simply the whole state broke down and the time of the so-called warlords came.

The dark period began when the law system in Somalia ceased to exist and the warlords along with gangs and militias took control of Mogadishu. It was a time of fear, poverty, hunger and death, which the inhabitants of the city are still reluctant to speak about. An infamous and cruel battle, shown in the movie “Black Hawk Down”, took place then. Eighteen American soldiers and over one thousand Somalis were killed.

The end of the 90s was the time when the Somalis decided to rebuild the country. Many of them returned from exile and formed a Transitional Federal Government. The Islamic Court Union was established in 2006. It was founded by sharia courts. The cooperation between ICU and one of the warlords resulted in defeating other militias and gangs in the city and taking the power.

The civil war continued, only now between the Transitional Federal Government, supported by the Ethiopian army and recognized by the international community, and parties supporting the Islamic courts. Finally, the Transitional Federal Government – with the help of the Ethiopian army and the African Union troops – defeated the Islamist forces and took control of the capital. Then it moved there its seat from Baidoa. The defeated Islamic Court Union broke into some smaller groups. Al Shaabab organization – recognized as a terrorist one –  formed and began fighting with the government. It is still active and is responsible for many acts of terror, mainly bloody bomb attacks in Mogadishu.

Since then life, law and civilization began to make its way to Mogadishu. Slowly, because of the Al Shaabab activity, but steadily. You can still see the photos of Mogadishu from the 70’s. Comparing to the present, it is hard to imagine that it is the same city. It is even more difficult to understand how people lived there in times when the ideas of the state and law simply did not exist in Mogadishu. And how – despite all the changes – Mogadishu is still inhabited by so many people. Throughout the dark period of the warlords’ rule, a certain, fully deserved, stereotype of the city was created as an extremely dangerous place to visit. Even the journalists described it as a “no go zone”, due to the high risk.

On the other hand, this city, which was a symbol of fear, suffering and death, is also a symbol of hope. A symbol of a place, which can be changed and return to normal life thanks to the international aid and support. And these “terrifying Somalis”, when you get to know them, are so kind-hearted and smiling people. Despite the hardships, they only dream about a normal life in the city that will become the “The white Pearl of the Indian Ocean” again.

Photos and text: Marcin Suder
***
Design: Arkadiusz Sołdon
Coding: Piotr Kliks
Sound: Marcin Hinz
Voice over: Maciej Nawrocki

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Street children

Children are an extension of ourselves and because of that it’s difficult to accept that they have become victims of the reality they live in. The exact number of street children living in Mogadishu remains unknown, but it is considered that there are a few thousands of them. Those feral ex-soldiers and orphans who live in groups on the streets, which are connected through the shared addiction of glue fumes, have become the symbol of these cruel times in the city.

 

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

War is not only simply about killing. So many different stories emerge around it.

When you walk around Mogadishu and you are a careful watcher, you can see boys with blurred eyes, wandering in the streets and squeezing plastic bottles in their hands. They are the street children – young boys, addicted to drugs, carrying bottles filled with glue. Just to sniff it and get high.

Drug addiction in Somalia is a very serious problem. The most desirable one is khat.

Often you can see people holding bundles of small sticks with leaves. Women sell them on the streets, and men chew them, sitting in street cafes or just on the sidewalks. They chew khat, which is also very popular in Kenya and Yemen.

Khat is expensive. If there is not enough money to buy it, you are left with an ordinary glue to sniff.

Children are among victims of war. Children killed or living ones but hurt. They lose their parents. They are kidnapped and forcefully incorporated into army or militia. In order to become effective killing machines, they become addicted to drugs. It makes them cruel unthinking killers. A combination of drugs and killing devours their souls and minds extremely effectively.

When they finally become unnecessary or manage to free themselves and escape, they usually find themselves on the streets. While being destroyed by the drug abuse, knowing nothing but killing, they merge into groups in order to survive. Orphans, who lost their parents and other relatives, also joined these wild bunches, seeking a chance to stay alive. They quickly become influenced by the group members and start using drugs.

Day by day they try to get intoxicated and find anything to eat. They roam the city, browse the garbage bins, beg in the streets or try to steal something. The most important aim is to satisfy their craving, and then to satisfy their hunger. The latter one is of less importance.

Some NGOs build them tin huts. However, the groups are getting bigger and the huts do not have enough space, so some children sleep on the streets or under the bridge anyway.

There are also organizations running orphanages that send their employees to find these children and bring them to the orphanage. It is not an easy job, as a potential candidate must stop taking drugs and start learning at school. The drug addiction as well as the group’s influence are very strong factors. Moreover, children are dangerous and aggressive, especially while in a group. Only few of them can be persuaded and take advantage of the chance for a new life. There are also people of good will, like Madame Fatima, who live in the neighbourhood and try to do anything to help these poor children. Even though Fatima’s life is not an easy ride, she tries to raise some money or food to cook children some meal.

When this city returns to normality, when statehood and society are rebuilt, it will be a moment when the street children will be torn out of the of the street and addiction, and they will fully return to community.

Photos and text: Marcin Suder
***
Design: Arkadiusz Sołdon
Coding: Piotr Kliks
Sound: Marcin Hinz
Voice over: Maciej Nawrocki

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The future

Education is imperative for progress. It’s like a vaccine against fundamentalism and indoctrination. Somalis are aware that knowledge and wisdom for future generations are passes to the better world, and that’s why they genuinely fight for a better education of their children. Unfortunately, for the country which is rebuilding after an entire degradation, universal and free education is true a challenge. The vast majority of the schools, apart of those run by NGO’s, are private, and poverty is becoming the biggest barrier both for ordinary people and the country itself.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

If you want to kill a nation, kill it’s education. The void of statehood, which has developed, and the anarchy have caused a fadeaway of the education system in Mogadishu and all of Somalia. Over 75% of schools, if not all of them, have been destroyed. Textbooks, school equipment have become unavailable, while teachers and students dropped education and fled the country, or just tried to survive in these crazy times. Education is the foundation of society and nation, but still not many children have the possibility to attend school.

Only about 30% of them go to primary school and that is considering the cities, while in the rural areas this percentage drops to 18%. Because of poverty and nomad lifestyle sending children to schools is not common and very often basically impossible for many Somalian families.

Only 25% of women between 15 and 24 is literate, however out of the whole women population of Somalia it is less than 40%. The generation of 15-24 is considered to be lost.

Somalia has one of the lowest numbers of school enrollments in the world and the education system is on a verge of a breakdown.

A couple years ago the federal government started a program called „go 2 school” in order to increase the number of students in schools. It is estimated that over 4 million children out of an 11 million population in Somalia do not attend school. Education is the most important weapon in the current civil war. Availability of a good, basic education is crucial for the future of Somalia, but also extremely important in the fight for stability of the country and defeating Al-Shabaab.

In the rural areas, where Al-Shabaab is most active, education practically does not exist except of madrasas. For many families sending their child school is too expensive. Poverty forces them to send their offspring to work in order for the family to survive. That is why they have a very limited access to education and the only possibility is learning in a koranic school, where depending on an imam they are often indoctrinated. This is the reason why it is easier to recruit for Al-Shabaab without psychological coercion and death threats.

The Ministry of Education is convinced that education will keep the children away from the terrorist group and diminish the chances of joining the militia.

Photos and text: Marcin Suder
***
Design: Arkadiusz Sołdon
Coding: Piotr Kliks
Sound: Marcin Hinz
Voice over: Maciej Nawrocki

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Banadir

If one associates a hospital with asylum, a place where they can get help and find relief, Banadir Hospital is a complete contradiction of those terms. It is a place where patients experience terror, panic, suffering and hopelessness. Nevertheless, Somalis used to be able to travel for a few days just to reach this hospital that for many years has been the only hospital in the whole province.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

A couple of years ago Banadir was the only hospital in Mogadishu. Actually not only there, but also in the whole region. And it was a horrifying place. After stepping in a person gets a feeling like he just entered a hospital in a besieged city. – Crowded, suffering in the faces grimaced with pain, panic and despair in the eyes of family members of the inpatient, and in them a spark of pleading for a chance to turn the fate around and surface out of the depths of despair. Even Mogadishu, worn out by the years of war, seemed like a normal city in comparison to this place. The war time annihilated it, but still it lasted and continued the everyday fight for being a hospital.

Crowd, crowd everywhere, people laying down even in tents set up in the yard, and around them were members of their families washing, hanging up clothes or cooking. Here the doctors and nurses are only for treating the patients and even for that there are not enough of them, so there was no one to look after the patients except for their relatives. It was the only hospital in the region and some of them had to travel for days to reach it. And still the ones who arrived were the ones who were able to afford it, were desperate enough or had much luck on the way.

Hospitals everywhere have a specific smell to them. But here a person had a feeling of moving around in a sweet, sticky stench of moist, decay, sweat, pain and fear. It was the center of suffering of this city and nation. Booby traps explosions victims, living skeletons of children, the evidence of famine, and simply the ill who seek help from doctors. Some of them sit on the stairs, other lay on frames of old beds, old mattresses placed on the ground, or on shawls. Looking at this place it is hard to imagine that anyone can be cured here.

This hospital lacked everything, beginning with personnel, medical apparatus, equipment, supplies and ending with electricity, but more of fuel for the generators, because this huge hospital the only power it has comes from the generators. The only thing it does not lack are the patients. This place lasts only thanks to support from the NGOs, because it does not have any official financing or support.

Today this hospital is one of the symbol of changes, which are happening in this city. Renovated, with electricity, personnel and equipment, it has changed, but it’s everyday life – not. It still continues to deal with the despair of victims of attacks, famine and their families. It is still crowded, because the situation in the region has not changed, but hope emerges, which supersedes the panic from the hearts after reaching this place, which now looks like a hospital and not the depths of despair.

Photos and text: Marcin Suder
***
Design: Arkadiusz Sołdon
Coding: Piotr Kliks
Sound: Marcin Hinz
Voice over: Maciej Nawrocki

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Veterans

The Veterans Hospital Martino is the history of Somalia in a nutshell. It was first established in 1912 during the colonial times as an Italian military hospital. In the 60s, when Somalia gained independence, it was transformed into a normal hospital, which again became a military one in the 70s during the Somali-Ethiopian conflict. When the statehood of Somalia and Mogadishu was taken over by the warlords, gangs and militias in the 90s, medical personnel escaped leaving the crippled veterans on their own. And those who did not have anywhere to go stayed in this abandoned place for more than twenty years of turmoil until it eventually became their home.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Martino Hospital is a journey through the history of the last century of Somalia.

It was built in 1910 by the Italians and for a very long time, despite its age, it operated as a hospital. After taking over rein by Siad Barre and starting war with Ethiopia in 1977 it was transformed to a military hospital for veterans. And it lasted as such until the fall of the government.

After warlords took over power, a story repeated itself in the hospital as it did in all the social and government institutions. – Personnel of the hospital fled to their homes to take care of their families. Wounded veterans, most of whom have been there since the wartime in 1977, but also from the successive conflicts of the eighties, were left without care and all alone. With no place to go they just stayed there and settled on the grounds of the former hospital.

Over three hundred veterans have lived there since that time, with time the number has increased by the spouses and families. During the fights in the nineties, as well as in 2006 between the federal government military and Al-Shabaab, the hospital has been shelled with mortars, even though it has never been the direct target of an attack. Nonetheless about 97 veterans died due to the shots or hunger.

Many of them are not able to work and they survived the civil war years thanks to the help of other people. A German NGO helped them during the 90s. – They cooked dishes, conducted sewing courses to make it possible for them to earn money, but after the battle with Americans many organizations left Mogadishu because of the danger. Later it got only harder. Often for half of the month they would live without food, with practically no access to medicine, and the food they managed to gather would be divided among themselves.

And so, as the history of Mogadishu rolls on and slowly changed the city, the changes also reach Martino. Veterans lived long lives, not harassed by anyone, but also not cared by anyone, so they lived in the building of the abandoned hospital. But after ousting Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu Somalians began to come back from migration and wanted to make their city come alive. Also the doctors came back and they saw the need to reactivate Martino in the city without any hospital. The forgotten veterans were discovered and became intruders. Today they are not found in Martino and the hospital has entered a new stage – restored became the most modern health facility in Somalia.

Photos and text: Marcin Suder
***
Design: Arkadiusz Sołdon
Coding: Piotr Kliks
Sound: Marcin Hinz
Voice over: Maciej Nawrocki

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Chaos

A human can endure many things as long as their brain can cope with the surrounding reality. If that pillar collapses, all the reality will fall to pieces. A continuous war and everyday struggles have turned Mogadishu into a mental illness factory. Ignorance, fear and lack of education make the daily life of mentally ill people terrifying. Their world is limited to two or three meters of a chain, which keeps them attached to trees. There is one man in this city who fights for the lives of these people. Doctor Habeb has released and started treatment for several thousand people as a part of the “Chain free” campaign.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

The human body can take a lot. When under threat, you feel as if you are about to fall apart[Ania Stan1] , however, the truth is that you don’t because you want to survive. You want to live and your mind will do anything to sustain life. On the other hand, if the threat breaks you and you give up the will to live, that’s the end of your body. What would it matter if you’re a walking dead anyway?

War is cruel, like cancer is to the human body and mind. It eats them alive. You try to resist but it gets harder and harder, it’s only a matter of time when you give in. The cruelty of war reaches far beyond the sanity scale. Here, in Mogadishu the war take its toll.

Lack of proper education adds to the problem of mental disorders in Somalia. People often don’t understand the changes in the behavior of their family members who’s mental health has been impacted by war. Nor do they know how to act on it. At first they feel ashamed and try to hide the “sick” ones, but soon the reality becomes brutal. When aggression comes into play and a person suffering from a mental disorder becomes a threat to their family or their own life, the family chains them to a tree. They do not know any better, they are just busy trying to survive every single day of war. Some had been chained to a tree or the wall inside of their house for three, seven or even ten years.

But there’s always a hero in every war, the one who persists to help others against all odds. In Mogadishu, it’s Dr Habeb.

Dr Habeb founded and operates the hospital where he strives to save those injured by war.  He’s been running the hospital for many years now, trying to raise funds and treat patients single-handedly. A very energetic and truly dedicated man, though you don’t need to look closely to understand the price he pays. There are times when he seems to be his own patient.

His faith gave him the drive to start his mission. He launched “Chain free”  and started to walk the streets of Mogadishu and its surroundings searching for the chained ones. He claims to have found and rescued over three thousands people during his “Chain free” operation.

There is over two hundred patients in Dr Habeb’s hospital and the numbers are rising. The staff consists of volunteers who are often  patients’ family members.

They get paid on a rare occasion when Habeb manages to raise funds greater than the hospital running expenses.

Dr Habeb gets some food and medicines for patients from the World Food Programme. UN also tries to help as well as some more affluent patients’ families or their relatives, who stay abroad.  Nevertheless, he has to take care of the business himself.

Every now and then Dr. Habeb appears on the radio, where he talks about the problems of his hospital, asks for support in order to be able to continue its activity, and informs people that there is a place, where they can find help for their relatives who are immobile at homes. Ab this plan works. New patients come from distant places, even if they have to travel for couple of days. Requests for support in poor society no longer have a clout, but the doctor’s speeches are famous, and people cheerfully quote his words as anecdotes.

Mr. Habeb sometimes loses patience and starts shouting on the radio that if people do not start to support this place, he will close the hospital down and release more than three hundred maniacs. They will roam the city, rob houses and destroy cars. – You will not be safe on the streets –  he says.

Photos and text: Marcin Suder
***
Design: Arkadiusz Sołdon
Coding: Piotr Kliks
Sound: Marcin Hinz
Voice over: Maciej Nawrocki

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