PL | EN

Indigenous dogs of North America and the evolution of Homo neanderthalensis

Based on recent archaeological findings, scientists believe Neanderthals probably developed the capacity for symbolic, complex thinking and at least elementary communication through symbols. They were able to cook, make jewellery and paint. According to a study carried out in 2021, the DNA of modern humans differs from that of Neanderthals by only 1.5 to 7%. Neanderthals walked upright like representatives of Homo sapiens, but they had more prominent noses that warmed and moistened the cold air they inhaled, while their larger eye sockets enabled them to see better in low light. Dental research suggests that they used their teeth almost like a third hand, e.g. to hold leather while processing it.

The dog companions of Native Americans, descendants of animals that arrived from Asia 14,000 years ago, resembled foxes or wolves and howled instead of barking. After discovering their bones and DNA fragments in Jamestown, Virginia, we know that these animals served various functions: they helped in hunting, kept their owners warm and protected, and served as draught animals and perhaps as companions in the afterlife. Salish Wool dogs were bred for their white fur from which blankets were woven. Sometimes dogs were eaten, such as during periods of famine, and the Iroquois held feasts dedicated to the god of war, during which they ritually consumed dog meat. Other indigenous groups made dog sacrifices. The indigenous dogs were soon replaced by European dogs and in today’s representatives of the species, there are virtually no genetic traces of these indigenous animals anymore.

Read also
Green energy development in 2023 and “wind drought”
Green energy development in 2023 and “wind drought”
Albania, Bhutan, Nepal, Paraguay, Iceland, Ethiopia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are great examples in the global energy landscape. The International Energy Agency (IEA) reports that these countries are the only ones in the world that derive almost all (over 99.7%) of their electricity from renewable sources. In recent years, 40 more countries, […]
Drought in Kenya and Colombia and the revitalization of European rivers
Drought in Kenya and Colombia and the revitalization of European rivers
Europe made significant progress in river revitalization by removing almost 500 dams and other barriers from its rivers in 2023. This step has helped restore waterways to their natural state and was a 50% increase compared to the previous year. The leaders in river revitalization are France, Spain, Sweden, and Denmark. However, it is important […]
Metals: USA, Great Britain, China and Russia
Metals: USA, Great Britain, China and Russia
Britain and the United States have imposed a ban on the sale of Russian aluminium, copper and nickel on the London Metal Exchange (LME). This ban will cause a decline in demand and prices for Russian supplies. However, Russians will still be able to sell their metals to buyers outside of the US and UK […]
Retired robot, “Emo” and cyborg cockroaches
Retired robot, “Emo” and cyborg cockroaches
Boston Dynamics has announced that it is retiring its most famous humanoid robot, Atlas HD, after 11 years of service. Atlas HD was known for its ability to overcome obstacle courses and perform jumps and somersaults, making it a significant milestone in the humanoid robot industry. Boston Dynamics has already introduced the successor to the […]
Brain tricks: crying, blinking, remembering and altruism
Brain tricks: crying, blinking, remembering and altruism
According to research conducted by Swiss-German scientists, the areas of our brain responsible for reward processing are activated when we make choices that bring happiness to ourselves and others. This activation leads to feelings of satisfaction and pleasure. Our decision-making process involves considering not only our own desires but also the desires of others. This […]
Previous issues