PL | EN

The Guyana-Venezuela conflict and the problems of Colombia and Nicaragua

For decades, maps  and charts produced in Venezuela have depicted the Guyanese-owned territory of almost 160,000 square kilometres – that’s almost ¾ of Guyana – as an integral part of Venezuela. Guyana strongly rejects Venezuelan claims and is supported by the rest of the world in doing so. When in 2015, ExxonMobil discovered huge oil reserves (around 11 billion barrels) in the ocean floor off the coast of Guyana – in territory disputed according to Venezuela – Venezuelan propaganda set off with redoubled force. Therefore, at Guyana’s urging, the United Nations 2018 referred the case to the International Court of Justice to finally settle the dispute between the two countries.

The Colombian government has resumed peace talks with the country’s largest rebel group, the National Liberation Army (ELN). In February, the Colombian authorities declared an informal ceasefire with four armed groups: The Gaitanista Self-Defence Forces (“Clan del Golfo”), two groups of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – People’s Army (FARC), which rejected the 2016 peace agreement, and a paramilitary group called the Conquistador Self-Defense Forces of the Sierra Nevada.

Nicaragua first released  222 political prisoners and sent them to the US – seen as a step towards easing tensions between the two countries – and then revoked the citizenship of 94 exiled dissidents. The UN deemed the decision contrary to international law and was also met with criticism from the US authorities. Among those who have had their citizenship revoked are writer Sergio Ramírez and Catholic bishop Silvio Báez.

Read also
European Union countries supporting migration
European Union countries supporting migration
The European Union will allocate approximately EUR 210 million to help Mauritania reduce the number of migrants passing through the country on their way to Spain’s Canary Islands. Even though Mauritania does not border the EU, many asylum seekers pass through its territory. According to official data, 83% of migrants arriving in the Canary Islands […]
Climate change: The Aral Sea, Chile wildfires and atmospheric rivers
Climate change: The Aral Sea, Chile wildfires and atmospheric rivers
Climate change is the reason for the disappearance of the Aral Sea in Central Asia, which the UN recognized as the most shocking disaster of the 20th century. Over several decades, one of the world’s largest inland bodies of water has shrunk to less than a quarter of its original size. This situation results from […]
Bird flu virus in Great Britain and endangered migratory species
Bird flu virus in Great Britain and endangered migratory species
According to a report by the British Trust for Ornithology and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, since the attack of the bird flu virus in 2021, Great Britain has lost, among others, over 75% of the great skua population. The virus has also caused a 21% decline in the population of roseate […]
Robotic guide dog, MiniTouch and a smart ring
Robotic guide dog, MiniTouch and a smart ring
Scientists from the University of Glasgow are developing a robotic dog similar to a guide dog. Using artificial intelligence, RoboGuide is intended to make it easier for blind and visually impaired people to move freely around spaces such as museums, hospitals and shopping malls. It will be based on mapping sensors and assessing the environment […]
Worms, nematodes and microorganisms in forensics, agriculture and nature conservation
Worms, nematodes and microorganisms in forensics, agriculture and nature conservation
Scientists from Chaminade University of Honolulu have identified a group of microorganisms that can be found on corpses at specific moments of their decomposition. It will make it easier to calculate the deceased’s time of death, which will be especially useful in criminal cases. In the study, a network of 20 different microorganisms appeared on […]
Previous issues