PL | EN

“Upcycling”, biophilia and mental health care in architecture

Sydney’s tallest building, the AMP Centre, was to be demolished and replaced with a new skyscraper. However, demolishing skyscrapers comes at a significant environmental cost, so it was decided to build a new skyscraper without destroying the old one. The result is the world’s first “upcycled” skyscraper, which has just been named World Building of the Year 2022. The 49-storey Quay Quarter Tower retained more than ⅔ of the old structure, including 95% of the building’s original core. This saved 12,000 tonnes of CO₂ that would have been emitted if the building had been demolished and started from scratch.

The CapitaSpring skyscraper, designed in the spirit of biophilia, has opened in Singapore and is distinguished by the greenery woven into the building’s structure. From the ground floor, a lift leads to the Green Oasis, a spiral path in the garden that winds past exercise equipment, benches and tables as part of a walk through four floors of tropical flora. At ⅓ of the height, a glass and aluminium facade reveals plants and trees growing tens of metres above the ground. On the roof, there is a 418 m² farm where visitors can walk among fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers. The 51-storey building covers an area of almost 8400 m² and houses more than 80,000 trees and plants.

How can architecture prevent suicide and help people in mental health crisis? Offering designs that are comfortable and welcoming, where people feel happy and safe. For example, plants in a hospital environment reduce anxiety and lower patients’ blood pressure and heart rate. Access to ventilation and natural light works similarly.

Read also
Super-efficient photovoltaics and green energy batteries
Super-efficient photovoltaics and green energy batteries
Electricity suppliers in the US are incorporating lithium-ion batteries into solar and wind projects to store electricity in large quantities. These batteries are designed to maintain a steady flow of electricity even when there is no wind or sun. The US is the second-largest electricity storage market in the world, after China. The total capacity […]
Gender inequalities at work and the men’s Garrick Club
Gender inequalities at work and the men’s Garrick Club
According to a survey by human resources consulting company Robert Half International Inc., 37% of women and 32% of men expressed dissatisfaction with their professional careers. Ally Nathaniel, owner of Soul Staffing Solutions, believes that the workplace was not designed with women’s needs in mind and still largely operates according to the same standards as […]
Hyperloop, AI financial advisor and “internet” record
Hyperloop, AI financial advisor and “internet” record
A European test centre for Hyperloop, a futuristic transport technology based on capsules moving at around 700 km/h through reduced-pressure tunnels, has been opened in Veendam, the Netherlands. The 420-metre-long tunnel is intended to serve as a space for developing this technology over the next few years. The centre’s director, Sascha Lamme, expects that by […]
The strategic Sela tunnel in India and the Sino-Philippine disputes
The strategic Sela tunnel in India and the Sino-Philippine disputes
In March of this year, Indian authorities opened the Sela Tunnel, a critical project in mountainous terrain at an altitude of almost 4,000 metres above sea level. The tunnel will allow India to move troops safely and improve all-weather communication with the Tawang region in Arunachal Pradesh, which is disputed with China. The Chinese authorities […]
Landslides, floods and climate change
Landslides, floods and climate change
Due to climate change, the Mekong Delta is one of the most vulnerable areas in the world. The rainy season brings more floods, while the dry season brings more droughts. Farming is becoming increasingly challenging due to the loss of land, rising sea levels, and water loss from upstream dams. As a result, many of […]
Previous issues